Jamaal May in the New York Times

From the Times’ Learning Network Weekly Poetry Pairing: One hundred years ago, Poetry published Carl Sandburg’s famous poem, “Chicago.” Last month the magazine published Jamaal May’s poem for Detroit, “There Are Birds Here.” Jamaal May published his first book, “Hum,” in 2013. ‘There Are Birds Here’ By Jamaal May For Detroit There are birds here, so…

Some Leading Lines from May’s Collection

“Pomegranate Means Grenade” Hold a pomegranate in your palm. Imagine ways to split it. Think of the breaking skin as shrapnel. Remember granada means pomegranate and granada means grenade because grenade takes its name from the fruit… “Macrophobia” I love too many women is not the best lead-in for a conversation that will end with…

Comely Words to Ear or Eye by Tarfia Faizullah (filmed by Jamaal May)

Tarfia Faizullah’s ” Elegy with Her Red-Tipped Fingers” THE POEM READ in her pleasant voice, filmed by audio engineer/LitFest poet Jammal May Tarfia Faizullah’s “Elegy with Her Red-Tipped Fingers” READ THE POEM with its shapely look and clever lineation In two weeks I’ll cross two oceans wide as the funeral processions to your grave: bearded…

Jamaal May Sings Detroit

 Detroit, Michigan has a poet named Jaamal May who sings his city alive. (Read the Huffington Post article in full.) Jamaal calls himself a ‘working artist,’ which spans a broad spectrum. One of America’s most talented and recognized slam poets, he has expanded his talents as a writer and performer to the page. His poems can be found in…

Jamaal May, In the LA Review of Books

In Jamaal May’s Hum, its onomatopoetic title refers to the humming of motors (usually in cars) and to the humming of humans. These parallel frequencies (or movements) of sound intersect in a young man growing up in Detroit. As he perceives the particulars of urban life and landscape, he begins to see himself manifested in the city’s…